ScrollSet Examples

What is a ScrollSet? Read the one page paper.
Note: these ScrollSets were generated by LLMs without extensive human review.
What is a ScrollSet? Read the one page paper.
Note: these ScrollSets were generated by LLMs without extensive human review.

Concepts

id description durability moistureContent workability density hardness growthRate
Douglas Fir Commonly used in construction for its strength and availability Moderate 12-15% Good 530 660 24
Southern Yellow Pine Known for its high density and strength, often used in heavy construction Moderate 8-12% Moderate 580 870 20
White Oak Highly durable and resistant to moisture, used for both interior and exterior applications High 8-12% Fair 770 1360 12
Black Walnut Valued for its workability and aesthetic appeal, commonly used in fine furniture and finishes High 8-12% Excellent 610 1010 24
Red Maple Versatile and widely available, used for furniture and flooring Moderate 6-8% Good 630 950 24
Eastern White Pine Lightweight and easy to work with, used in millwork and cabinetry Low 12-15% Excellent 380 380 36
Western Red Cedar Naturally resistant to decay, used for outdoor applications like decking and siding High 10-12% Good 390 350 24
Sugar Maple Hard and strong, ideal for flooring and butcher blocks Moderate 6-8% Fair 740 1450 12
Sitka Spruce Known for its high strength-to-weight ratio, used in aircraft and marine applications Low 12-15% Good 450 510 24
Ponderosa Pine Widely used in construction for its workability and availability Low 12-15% Good 420 460 18

Measures

Name Values Coverage Question Example Type Source SortIndex IsComputed IsRequired IsConceptDelimiter Crux
id 10 100% What is the ID of this concept? Douglas Fir string 1 false true true
description 10 100% A brief description of the tree's properties and uses Commonly used in construction for its strength and availability string 1.9 false
durability 10 100% The natural durability of the wood against decay and pests Moderate string 1.9 false
moistureContent 10 100% The typical moisture content of the wood when used in construction 12-15% string 1.9 false
workability 10 100% The ease with which the wood can be cut, shaped, and finished Good string 1.9 false
density 10 100% The density of the wood in kilograms per cubic meter (kg/m^3) 530 number 1.9 false
hardness 10 100% The Janka hardness rating of the wood, measuring its resistance to wear and denting 660 number 1.9 false
growthRate 10 100% The growth rate of the tree in inches per year 24 number 1.9 false
Continue reading...
What is a ScrollSet? Read the one page paper.
Note: these ScrollSets were generated by LLMs without extensive human review.

Concepts

id description formula shortFormula units
Stress in Beam Determines the internal forces within a beam stress = moment*distanceFromNeutralAxis/secondMomentOfArea Οƒ = M*c/I NewtonPerSquareMeter
Shear Force in Beam Measures the force that causes parts of a material to slide past each other in opposite directions shearForce = ∫(dMoment/dx) dx V = ∫(dM/dx) dx Newton
Bending Moment in Beam Calculates the reaction induced in a structural element when an external force is applied, causing the element to bend bendingMoment = ∫(shearForce dx) M = ∫(V dx) NewtonMeter
Deflection of Beam Calculates the displacement of a point on the beam under load deflection = load*length^3 / (48*modulusOfElasticity*secondMomentOfArea) Ξ΄ = PL^3 / (48EI) Meter
Natural Frequency of Bridge Determines the frequency at which the bridge will naturally vibrate naturalFrequency = (1/2Ο€) * √(stiffness/mass) f_n = (1/2Ο€) * √(k/m) Hertz
Buckling Load Determines the critical load at which a column will buckle criticalLoad = Ο€^2*modulusOfElasticity*secondMomentOfArea / (effectiveLengthFactor*length)^2 P_cr = Ο€^2*EI / (KL)^2 Newton
Tensile Strength Measures the resistance of a material to breaking under tension tensileStrength = load/area Οƒ_t = P/A NewtonPerSquareMeter
Load-Bearing Capacity Determines the maximum weight the bridge can hold loadBearingCapacity = allowableStress * area P = f * A Newton

Measures

Name Values Coverage Question Example Type Source SortIndex IsComputed IsRequired IsConceptDelimiter Crux
id 8 100% What is the ID of this concept? Stress in Beam string 1 false true true
description 8 100% A brief description of the formula's purpose in bridge building Determines the internal forces within a beam string 1.9 false
formula 8 100% The mathematical formula or equation stress = moment*distanceFromNeutralAxis/secondMomentOfArea string 1.9 false
shortFormula 8 100% The abbreviated version. Οƒ = M*c/I string 1.9 false
units 8 100% The units of the result of the formula NewtonPerSquareMeter string 1.9 false
Continue reading...
What is a ScrollSet? Read the one page paper.
Note: these ScrollSets were generated by LLMs without extensive human review.

Concepts

id description formula units
Stress in Beam Determines the internal forces within a beam stress = moment*distanceFromNeutralAxis/secondMomentOfArea NewtonPerSquareMeter
Shear Force in Beam Measures the force that causes parts of a material to slide past each other in opposite directions shearForce = ∫(dMoment/dx) dx Newton
Bending Moment in Beam Calculates the reaction induced in a structural element when an external force is applied, causing the element to bend bendingMoment = ∫(shearForce dx) NewtonMeter
Deflection of Beam Calculates the displacement of a point on the beam under load deflection = load*length^3 / (48*modulusOfElasticity*secondMomentOfArea) Meter
Load-Bearing Capacity Determines the maximum weight the structure can hold loadBearingCapacity = allowableStress * area Newton
Thermal Conductivity Measures the rate at which heat passes through a material heatTransfer = thermalConductivity * area * temperatureDifference / thickness WattPerMeterKelvin
R-Value Indicates the resistance of a material to heat flow rValue = thickness / thermalConductivity SquareMeterKelvinPerWatt
Heat Loss Calculates the total heat loss through a structure heatLoss = area * uValue * temperatureDifference Watt
Concrete Mix Design Determines the proportions of materials in concrete concreteMix = (cement : sand : aggregate : water) Ratio
Roof Slope Determines the pitch of the roof roofSlope = rise / run Ratio
Brick Calculation Estimates the number of bricks needed for a wall numberOfBricks = wallArea / brickArea Integer

Measures

Name Values Coverage Question Example Type Source SortIndex IsComputed IsRequired IsConceptDelimiter Crux
id 11 100% What is the ID of this concept? Stress in Beam string 1 false true true
description 11 100% A brief description of the formula's purpose in home building Determines the internal forces within a beam string 1.9 false
formula 11 100% The mathematical formula or equation stress = moment*distanceFromNeutralAxis/secondMomentOfArea string 1.9 false
units 11 100% The units of the result of the formula NewtonPerSquareMeter string 1.9 false
Continue reading...
What is a ScrollSet? Read the one page paper.
Note: these ScrollSets were generated by LLMs without extensive human review.

Concepts

id description level
Stock Trading The buying and selling of shares of publicly traded companies Surface
Options Financial instruments that give the buyer the right, but not the obligation, to buy or sell an asset at a predetermined price Surface
Bonds Debt securities issued by entities to raise capital, with a promise to pay back with interest Surface
Forex The market for trading foreign currencies Surface
Black-Scholes A mathematical model for pricing options Basic
CAPM Capital Asset Pricing Model, used to determine the expected return on an asset Basic
Arbitrage The practice of taking advantage of price differences in different markets Basic
Greeks Risk measures for options, including Delta, Gamma, Theta, Vega, and Rho Basic
Stochastic Calculus A branch of mathematics used to model random processes Intermediate
Monte Carlo A statistical technique using random sampling to approximate solutions Intermediate
Volatility Smile A pattern in which options with different strike prices have different implied volatilities Intermediate
Ito's Lemma A key result in stochastic calculus used in the derivation of the Black-Scholes equation Advanced
Brownian Motion A continuous-time stochastic process used to model random movements Advanced
Martingales A class of stochastic processes with specific properties useful in financial modeling Advanced
HJM Heath-Jarrow-Morton framework, a model for the evolution of interest rates Advanced
Malliavin Calculus A branch of mathematics providing tools for differentiating stochastic processes Expert
Levy Processes Stochastic processes with stationary independent increments Expert
Rough Volatility A recent development in financial modeling that captures roughness in volatility paths Expert

Measures

Name Values Coverage Question Example Type Source SortIndex IsComputed IsRequired IsConceptDelimiter Crux
id 18 100% What is the ID of this concept? Stock Trading string 1 false true true
description 18 100% A brief description of the concept in quantitative finance The buying and selling of shares of publicly traded companies string 1.9 false
idLink 18 100% A URL to the wikipedia page for the concept https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trade_(finance) string 1.9 false idLink
level 18 100% The level of complexity of the concept in quantitative finance Surface string 1.9 false
Continue reading...
What is a ScrollSet? Read the one page paper.
Note: these ScrollSets were generated by LLMs without extensive human review.

Concepts

id description speed
Air The most common medium for sound, with speed influenced by temperature, humidity, and pressure 343
Water A denser medium than air, allowing sound to travel faster 1482
Steel A dense and elastic solid, sound travels much faster compared to air and water 5960
Glass A brittle solid with a high speed of sound due to its rigidity 5200
Wood (Oak) A natural solid with varying speed depending on density and elasticity 3850
Aluminum A lightweight and strong metal, widely used in engineering 6320
Rubber A flexible solid with much slower speed of sound compared to metals 1500
Concrete A composite material used in construction, with speed influenced by its density and composition 3200
Copper A highly conductive metal, also known for its high speed of sound 3900
Lead A dense metal with a relatively slower speed of sound due to its softness 1200

Measures

Name Values Coverage Question Example Type Source SortIndex IsComputed IsRequired IsConceptDelimiter Crux
id 10 100% What is the ID of this concept? Air string 1 false true true
description 10 100% A brief description of the material The most common medium for sound, with speed influenced by temperature, humidity, and pressure string 1.9 false
speed 10 100% The speed of sound in the material in meters per second (m/s) 343 number 1.9 false
Continue reading...
What is a ScrollSet? Read the one page paper.
Note: these ScrollSets were generated by LLMs without extensive human review.

Concepts

id mediatorParticle interactionType unification discoverer mathematicalFormulation experimentalEvidence quantumTheory classicalTheory applications symmetry discoveryYear strength range strengthScale massless
Gravity Graviton (theoretical) All particles with mass Not unified with other forces yet Isaac Newton F = G * (m1 * m2) / r^2 Cavendish experiment General Relativity (attempts at Quantum Gravity) Newton's Law of Gravitation Orbits, planetary motion, tides Spacetime symmetry 1687 6.6743e-11 Infinity 1 true
Electromagnetic Photon Charged particles Unified with weak force (Electroweak theory) James Clerk Maxwell F = k * (q1 * q2) / r^2 Hertz's experiments on electromagnetic waves Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) Maxwell's Equations Electricity, magnetism, light Gauge symmetry (U(1)) 1864 1 Infinity 2 true
Weak W and Z bosons All fermions Unified with electromagnetic force (Electroweak theory) Enrico Fermi Described by Fermi's interaction Observed in beta decay Quantum Flavour Dynamics (QFD) Fermi's Theory of Beta Decay Radioactive decay, nuclear fusion Gauge symmetry (SU(2)) 1934 0.00001 1e-18 3 false
Strong Gluon Quarks and gluons Part of Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) Murray Gell-Mann Described by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) Deep inelastic scattering experiments Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) Does not have a classical counterpart Binding protons and neutrons in nuclei Gauge symmetry (SU(3)) 1973 1 1e-15 4 true

Measures

Name Values Coverage Question Example Type Source SortIndex IsComputed IsRequired IsConceptDelimiter Crux
id 4 100% What is the ID of this concept? Gravity string 1 false true true
mediatorParticle 4 100% The particle that mediates the force Graviton (theoretical) string 1.9 false
interactionType 4 100% The type of particles that the force interacts with All particles with mass string 1.9 false
unification 4 100% Theoretical unification of the force with others Not unified with other forces yet string 1.9 false
discoverer 4 100% The scientist(s) who discovered or proposed the force Isaac Newton string 1.9 false
mathematicalFormulation 4 100% The mathematical formulation or equation that describes the force F = G * (m1 * m2) / r^2 string 1.9 false
experimentalEvidence 4 100% Key experimental evidence supporting the existence of the force Cavendish experiment string 1.9 false
quantumTheory 4 100% The quantum field theory describing the force General Relativity (attempts at Quantum Gravity) string 1.9 false
classicalTheory 4 100% The classical theory or law describing the force Newton's Law of Gravitation string 1.9 false
applications 4 100% Practical applications or phenomena explained by the force Orbits, planetary motion, tides string 1.9 false
symmetry 4 100% The symmetry or invariance associated with the force Spacetime symmetry string 1.9 false
discoveryYear 4 100% The year the force was discovered or proposed 1687 number 1.9 false
strength 4 100% The relative strength of the force compared to the other forces 6.6743e-11 number 1.9 false
range 4 100% The range of the force in meters Infinity number 1.9 false
strengthScale 4 100% The scale of strength (from 0 to 1) for comparison among the forces 1 number 1.9 false
massless 4 100% Whether the mediator particle is massless (true/false) true boolean 1.9 false
Continue reading...
What is a ScrollSet? Read the one page paper.
Note: these ScrollSets were generated by LLMs without extensive human review.

Concepts

id creditedTo country fieldOfPhysics equation yearAppeared applications complexity
Newton's Second Law Isaac Newton England Mechanics F = ma 1687 100 2
Einstein's Mass-Energy Equivalence Albert Einstein Switzerland Relativity E = mc^2 1905 50 5
SchrΓΆdinger Equation Erwin SchrΓΆdinger Austria Quantum Mechanics i\hbar\frac{\partial}{\partial t}\psi = \hat{H}\psi 1926 100 7
Maxwell's Equations James Clerk Maxwell Scotland Electromagnetism \begin{align*} \nabla \cdot \mathbf{E} &= \frac{\rho}{\epsilon_0} \\ \nabla \cdot \mathbf{B} &= 0 \\ \nabla \times \mathbf{E} &= -\frac{\partial \mathbf{B}}{\partial t} \\ \nabla \times \mathbf{B} &= \mu_0 \mathbf{J} + \mu_0 \epsilon_0 \frac{\partial \mathbf{E}}{\partial t} \end{align*} 1865 50 6
Boltzmann Equation Ludwig Boltzmann Austria Statistical Mechanics \frac{\partial f}{\partial t} + \mathbf{v} \cdot \nabla f + \mathbf{a} \cdot \frac{\partial f}{\partial \mathbf{v}} = \left( \frac{\partial f}{\partial t} \right)_\text{collision} 1872 30 8
Planck's Equation Max Planck Germany Quantum Mechanics E = h\nu 1900 40 6
Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle Werner Heisenberg Germany Quantum Mechanics \Delta x \Delta p \geq \frac{\hbar}{2} 1927 20 5
Hubble's Law Edwin Hubble USA Cosmology v = H_0 d 1929 25 4
Fourier Transform Joseph Fourier France Mathematical Physics \hat{f}(\xi) = \int_{-\infty}^{\infty} f(x) e^{-2\pi i x \xi} \, dx 1822 70 6
Lorentz Transformation Hendrik Lorentz Netherlands Relativity \begin{align*} t' &= \gamma \left( t - \frac{vx}{c^2} \right) \\ x' &= \gamma (x - vt) \end{align*} 1904 20 6
Dirac Equation Paul Dirac UK Quantum Mechanics \left( i\gamma^\mu \partial_\mu - m \right) \psi = 0 1928 30 9
Navier-Stokes Equation Claude-Louis Navier, George Gabriel Stokes France, UK Fluid Mechanics \rho \left( \frac{\partial \mathbf{u}}{\partial t} + (\mathbf{u} \cdot \nabla) \mathbf{u} \right) = -\nabla p + \mu \nabla^2 \mathbf{u} + \mathbf{f} 1822 50 9
Ohm's Law Georg Ohm Germany Electromagnetism V = IR 1827 100 2
Hooke's Law Robert Hooke England Mechanics F = -kx 1678 60 2
Kepler's Third Law Johannes Kepler Germany Astronomy T^2 \propto r^3 1619 30 3
Bernoulli's Principle Daniel Bernoulli Switzerland Fluid Mechanics p + \frac{1}{2}\rho v^2 + \rho gh = \text{constant} 1738 50 4
Faraday's Law of Induction Michael Faraday England Electromagnetism \mathcal{E} = -\frac{d\Phi_B}{dt} 1831 40 5
Stefan-Boltzmann Law Josef Stefan, Ludwig Boltzmann Austria Thermodynamics j^* = \sigma T^4 1879 30 5
Lenz's Law Heinrich Lenz Russia Electromagnetism \mathcal{E} = -\frac{d\Phi_B}{dt} 1834 30 4
Coulomb's Law Charles-Augustin de Coulomb France Electrostatics F = k_e \frac{q_1 q_2}{r^2} 1785 50 3
Fermi-Dirac Statistics Enrico Fermi, Paul Dirac Italy, UK Quantum Mechanics f(E) = \frac{1}{e^{(E - \mu)/kT} + 1} 1926 40 7
Bose-Einstein Statistics Satyendra Nath Bose, Albert Einstein India, Germany Quantum Mechanics f(E) = \frac{1}{e^{(E - \mu)/kT} - 1} 1924 30 7
Wien's Displacement Law Wilhelm Wien Germany Thermodynamics \lambda_\text{peak} T = b 1893 25 5
Poisson's Equation SimΓ©on Denis Poisson France Mathematical Physics \nabla^2 \phi = -\frac{\rho}{\epsilon_0} 1813 30 6
Ampère's Law André-Marie Ampère France Electromagnetism \nabla \times \mathbf{B} = \mu_0 \mathbf{J} 1826 40 4
Biot-Savart Law Jean-Baptiste Biot, FΓ©lix Savart France Electromagnetism d\mathbf{B} = \frac{\mu_0}{4\pi} \frac{I d\mathbf{l} \times \mathbf{\hat{r}}}{r^2} 1820 30 5
Kirchhoff's Circuit Laws Gustav Kirchhoff Germany Electrical Circuits \begin{align*} \sum I = 0 \\ \sum V = 0 \end{align*} 1845 50 3
Gibbs Free Energy Josiah Willard Gibbs USA Thermodynamics G = H - TS 1873 30 6
Avogadro's Law Amedeo Avogadro Italy Chemistry V \propto n 1811 30 3
de Broglie Hypothesis Louis de Broglie France Quantum Mechanics \lambda = \frac{h}{p} 1924 25 6

Measures

Name Values Coverage Question Example Type Source SortIndex IsComputed IsRequired IsConceptDelimiter Crux
id 30 100% What is the ID of this concept? Newton's Second Law string 1 false true true
creditedTo 30 100% The person or persons credited with the formulation of the equation Isaac Newton string 1.9 false
country 30 100% The country associated with the credited person(s) at the time of the formulation England string 1.9 false
fieldOfPhysics 30 100% The field of physics where the equation is primarily used Mechanics string 1.9 false
equation 30 100% The equation written in KaTeX (LaTeX) F = ma string 1.9 false
yearAppeared 30 100% The year the equation first appeared or was formulated 1687 number 1.9 false
applications 30 100% The number of major applications or uses of the equation 100 number 1.9 false
complexity 30 100% The relative complexity of the equation (scale 1 to 10) 2 number 1.9 false
Continue reading...
What is a ScrollSet? Read the one page paper.
Note: these ScrollSets were generated by LLMs without extensive human review.

Concepts

id creditedTo country application impact yearAppeared importanceRank
Newton's Second Law (F = ma) Isaac Newton England Classical mechanics Fundamental equation of motion, used in all areas of physics 1687 1
Maxwell's Equations James Clerk Maxwell Scotland Electromagnetism Unified electricity, magnetism, and light; basis for modern electrodynamics 1865 2
SchrΓΆdinger Equation Erwin SchrΓΆdinger Austria Quantum mechanics Describes the behavior of matter and energy at the atomic and subatomic level 1926 3
Einstein's Energy-Mass Equivalence (E = mc^2) Albert Einstein Germany/Switzerland Special relativity, nuclear physics Relates energy to mass, key to understanding nuclear reactions and energy 1905 4
Hubble's Law Edwin Hubble United States Cosmology Established the expansion of the universe, cornerstone of Big Bang theory 1929 5
Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle Werner Heisenberg Germany Quantum mechanics Fundamental limit on precision of measurements at quantum scale 1927 6
Boltzmann's Entropy Equation Ludwig Boltzmann Austria Thermodynamics, statistical mechanics Relates entropy to number of microscopic states, foundation of statistical physics 1877 7
Planck's Energy Quantum Max Planck Germany Quantum mechanics Introduced the concept of energy quanta, launching quantum theory 1900 8
Dirac Equation Paul Dirac England Quantum mechanics, special relativity Relativistic quantum mechanical wave equation, predicted antimatter 1928 9
Euler's Equation (e^(i*pi) + 1 = 0) Leonhard Euler Switzerland Complex analysis Relates fundamental constants e, i, pi; considered most beautiful equation 1748 10
Principle of Least Action Pierre Louis Maupertuis France Classical mechanics Alternative formulation of mechanics using variational principle 1744 11
Noether's Theorem Emmy Noether Germany Theoretical physics Connects symmetries to conservation laws, fundamental to modern physics 1915 12
Navier-Stokes Equations Claude-Louis Navier, George Stokes France, Ireland Fluid dynamics Describes motion of viscous fluids, used in aerodynamics, weather, & more 1822 13
Riemann Hypothesis Bernhard Riemann Germany Number theory Conjectured rule for distribution of prime numbers, unproven but very important 1859 14
Gauss's Law Carl Friedrich Gauss Germany Electrostatics Relates electric field to charge distribution, part of Maxwell's equations 1835 15
Ampère's Circuital Law André-Marie Ampère France Magnetostatics Relates magnetic field to electric current, part of Maxwell's equations 1826 16
Faraday's Law of Induction Michael Faraday England Electromagnetism Describes how changing magnetic field induces electric field 1831 17
Boyle's Law Robert Boyle Ireland Thermodynamics Relates pressure and volume of gas at constant temperature 1662 18
Fourier's Heat Equation Joseph Fourier France Heat transfer Describes conduction of heat in solids, used in many applications 1822 19
Coulomb's Law Charles-Augustin de Coulomb France Electrostatics Describes force between electric charges, foundation of electrostatics 1785 20
Kepler's Laws of Planetary Motion Johannes Kepler Germany Astronomy Describes motion of planets around the Sun, basis for Newton's gravity 1609 21
Lorentz Force Law Hendrik Lorentz Netherlands Electromagnetism Describes force on charge moving in electromagnetic field 1895 22
Biot-Savart Law Jean-Baptiste Biot, FΓ©lix Savart France Magnetostatics Describes magnetic field generated by electric current 1820 23
Fermat's Principle of Least Time Pierre de Fermat France Optics Light travels path that takes least time, explains refraction and reflection 1662 24
Fresnel Equations Augustin-Jean Fresnel France Optics Describe reflection and transmission of light at interface between media 1823 25
Snell's Law Willebrord Snellius Netherlands Optics Relates angles of incidence and refraction for light crossing boundary 1621 26
Hooke's Law Robert Hooke England Mechanics, materials science Linearly relates force and extension in spring, describes elastic materials 1660 27
Bragg's Law William Henry Bragg, William Lawrence Bragg England Crystallography Describes condition for diffraction by crystal lattice planes 1913 28
Carnot's Theorem Sadi Carnot France Thermodynamics Limits the maximum efficiency of any heat engine 1824 29
Lagrange's Equations Joseph-Louis Lagrange Italy/France Classical mechanics Reformulates Newtonian mechanics, basis for Hamiltonian mechanics 1788 30

Measures

Name Values Coverage Question Example Type Source SortIndex IsComputed IsRequired IsConceptDelimiter Crux
id 30 100% What is the ID of this concept? Newton's Second Law (F = ma) string 1 false true true
creditedTo 30 100% The physicist(s) credited with discovering or formulating the equation Isaac Newton string 1.9 false
country 30 100% The country where the equation was discovered or formulated England string 1.9 false
application 30 100% The primary application or area of physics the equation is used in Classical mechanics string 1.9 false
impact 30 100% The impact or significance of the equation in physics and beyond Fundamental equation of motion, used in all areas of physics string 1.9 false
yearAppeared 30 100% The year the equation first appeared 1687 number 1.9 false
importanceRank 30 100% The ranking of the equation's importance in physics (1 = most important) 1 number 1.9 false
Continue reading...
What is a ScrollSet? Read the one page paper.
Note: these ScrollSets were generated by LLMs without extensive human review.

Concepts

id habitat diet averageHibernationDuration bodyTemperatureDrop heartRateReduction breathingRateReduction energySaved
Brown Bear Forests Omnivorous 180 10 20 5 50
Arctic Ground Squirrel Tundra Herbivorous 240 60 100 25 60
Common Poorwill Deserts Insectivorous 120 12 20 5 30
European Hedgehog Woodlands Insectivorous 150 40 50 10 70
Fat-tailed Dwarf Lemur Tropical Forests Frugivorous 180 15 15 5 40
Box Turtle Forests and Grasslands Omnivorous 150 20 10 2 50
Big Brown Bat Caves and Forests Insectivorous 180 30 100 20 80
Alpine Marmot Mountains Herbivorous 180 50 90 15 70
Raccoon Forests and Urban Areas Omnivorous 120 10 30 5 40
Eastern Chipmunk Forests Omnivorous 90 10 20 5 30
Wood Frog Wetlands Insectivorous 180 30 0 0 60
Snapping Turtle Freshwater Omnivorous 180 20 10 2 50
Blanding's Turtle Freshwater Omnivorous 150 20 10 2 50
Garter Snake Grasslands Carnivorous 180 10 10 5 40
Bumblebee Gardens and Meadows Nectar and Pollen 210 20 10 10 60
Groundhog Fields and Forests Herbivorous 150 40 50 10 70
Bear Forests and Mountains Omnivorous 120 12 10 5 50
Jerboa Deserts Herbivorous 180 15 20 5 40
Little Brown Bat Caves and Forests Insectivorous 180 30 100 20 80
Deer Mouse Forests and Grasslands Omnivorous 180 20 10 5 50

Measures

Name Values Coverage Question Example Type Source SortIndex IsComputed IsRequired IsConceptDelimiter Crux
id 20 100% What is the ID of this concept? Brown Bear string 1 false true true
habitat 20 100% The typical habitat of the animal Forests string 1.9 false
diet 20 100% The typical diet of the animal Omnivorous string 1.9 false
averageHibernationDuration 20 100% The average duration of hibernation in days 180 number 1.9 false
bodyTemperatureDrop 20 100% The average drop in body temperature during hibernation in degrees Fahrenheit 10 number 1.9 false
heartRateReduction 20 100% The average reduction in heart rate during hibernation in beats per minute (bpm) 20 number 1.9 false
breathingRateReduction 20 100% The average reduction in breathing rate during hibernation in breaths per minute 5 number 1.9 false
energySaved 20 100% The percentage of energy saved during hibernation 50 number 1.9 false
Continue reading...
This demonstrates putting Tab Separated Values (TSVs) directly in Scroll files.
Although this approach is handy for small datasets, it does not scale as well as ScrollSets.
Hormone_Name Chemical_Formula Min_Level_mmol_L Max_Level_mmol_L Peptide_Hormone Steroid_Hormone Amine_Hormone Half_Life_Minutes Pulsatile_Release Endocrine_Gland_ID
Insulin C₂₅₇Hβ‚ƒβ‚ˆβ‚ƒN₆₅O₇₇S₆ 0.0000365 0.000180 true false false 6 false 4
Glucagon C₁₅₃Hβ‚‚β‚‚β‚…N₄₃O₄₉S 0.00000125 0.000009 true false false 5 false 4
Thyroid hormones (T3 and T4) C₁₅H₁₁Iβ‚„NOβ‚„ (T4), C₁₅H₁₂I₃NOβ‚„ (T3) 0.0012 (T4), 0.0000015 (T3) 0.0023 (T4), 0.0000025 (T3) false false true 10080 (T4), 2880 (T3) false 2
Cortisol C₂₁H₃₀Oβ‚… 0.138 0.690 false true false 60 true 3
Adrenaline (epinephrine) C₉H₁₃NO₃ 0.00000546 0.00002180 false false true 2 false 3
Noradrenaline (norepinephrine) Cβ‚ˆH₁₁NO₃ 0.00000709 0.00005680 false false true 2 false 3
Growth hormone C₉₉₀H₁₅₂₉N₂₆₃O₃₀₀S₇ 0.0000003 0.000040 true false false 20 true 1
Testosterone C₁₉Hβ‚‚β‚ˆOβ‚‚ 0.00934 0.03470 false true false 60 false 5
Estrogen Cβ‚β‚ˆHβ‚‚β‚„Oβ‚‚ (Estradiol) 0.0000001 0.0000004 false true false 1440 false 5
Progesterone C₂₁H₃₀Oβ‚‚ 0.000032 0.001590 false true false 1440 false 5
Prolactin C₁₉₉H₃₁₀N₅₆O₅₉S 0.00000087 0.00000430 true false false 30 true 1
Oxytocin C₄₃H₆₆N₁₂O₁₂Sβ‚‚ 0.00000007 0.00000007 true false false 3 true 1
Vasopressin (antidiuretic hormone) C₄₆H₆₅N₁₅O₁₂Sβ‚‚ 0.00000028 0.00000028 true false false 10 true 1
Parathyroid hormone C₄₁₁H₆₂₆N₁₀₆O₁₁₀Sβ‚‚ 0.0000043 0.0000090 true false false 4 true 6
Calcitonin C₁₄₅Hβ‚‚β‚„β‚€Nβ‚„β‚„Oβ‚„β‚ˆSβ‚‚ 0.0000003 0.0000065 true false false 10 false 2
Leptin C₇₇₇H₁₂₁₂N₂₁₂O₂₄₃S₃ 0.0000027 0.0000270 true false false 90 false 0
Ghrelin C₁₄₉Hβ‚‚β‚„β‚…Nβ‚„β‚…Oβ‚„β‚ˆ 0.00000096 0.00000790 true false false 30 true 0
Melatonin C₁₃H₁₆Nβ‚‚Oβ‚‚ 0.0000001 0.0000005 false false true 40 true 7
Serotonin C₁₀H₁₂Nβ‚‚O 0.0000006 0.0000020 false false true 10 false 0
Dopamine Cβ‚ˆH₁₁NOβ‚‚ 0.0000001 0.0000002 false false true 2 false 0
Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) C₄₃₇Hβ‚†β‚ˆβ‚‚N₁₂₂O₁₃₄S₁₃ 0.0025 0.0210 true false false 180 true 1
Luteinizing hormone (LH) Cβ‚…β‚†β‚ˆH₉₁₂N₁₆₂O₁₇₇S₁₅ 0.0080 0.0790 true false false 60 true 1
Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) C₂₀₇Hβ‚ƒβ‚€β‚ˆN₅₆Oβ‚…β‚ˆS 0.000002 0.000022 true false false 10 true 1
Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) C₂₁₂H₃₃₂Nβ‚…β‚ˆO₆₄S₁₀ 0.00045 0.00462 true false false 60 true 1
Erythropoietin (EPO) Cβ‚ˆβ‚β‚…H₁₃₁₇N₂₂₉O₂₄₁Sβ‚… 0.000002 0.000030 true false false 360 false 9
Renin Cβ‚β‚‚β‚ˆβ‚‰H₂₀₂₆N₃₅₂Oβ‚ƒβ‚ˆβ‚€S₆ 0.00000060 0.00000300 true false false 30 true 10
Aldosterone C₂₁Hβ‚‚β‚ˆOβ‚… 0.00000083 0.00000970 false true false 30 true 3
Antidiuretic hormone (ADH) C₄₆H₆₅N₁₅O₁₂Sβ‚‚ 0.00000028 0.00000028 true false false 10 true 1
Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) Cβ‚β‚‚β‚ˆHβ‚‚β‚‚β‚„Nβ‚…β‚€Oβ‚„β‚… 0.00000030 0.00000065 true false false 2 true 11
Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) C₂₄₇Hβ‚ƒβ‚ˆβ‚‚Nβ‚†β‚ˆO₇₅S₆ 0.00000006 0.00001700 true false false 10 false 0
Calcitriol (active form of vitamin D) C₂₇Hβ‚„β‚„O₃ 0.0000000314 0.0000001555 false true false 900 false 12
Cholecystokinin (CCK) C₇₃H₁₁₅N₁₉Oβ‚‚β‚ˆSβ‚‚ 0.00000003 0.00000020 true false false 5 true 0
Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) Cβ‚‚β‚€β‚ˆHβ‚ƒβ‚‚β‚ˆN₆₀O₆₂Sβ‚„ 0.00000004 0.00000020 true false false 4 true 8
Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) C₁₉Hβ‚‚β‚ˆOβ‚‚ 0.00324 0.01390 false true false 4320 false 3
Endorphins C₁₇₃H₂₇₁N₅₇O₄₆S 0.00000006 0.00000060 true false false 7 false 0
Gastrin C₅₁Hβ‚ˆβ‚€Nβ‚β‚ˆOβ‚β‚ˆS₃ 0.00000002 0.00000040 true false false 6 true 13
Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) C₁₅₂Hβ‚‚β‚„β‚‚Nβ‚„β‚„Oβ‚…β‚… 0.00000007 0.00000055 true false false 2 true 14
Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) C₂₁₇H₃₁₆N₅₆O₅₇ 0.00000002 0.00000009 true false false 6 true 8
Histamine Cβ‚…H₉N₃ 0.0000005 0.0000020 false false true 1 false 0
Incretin Cβ‚β‚ˆβ‚‡Hβ‚‚β‚ˆβ‚…N₅₇O₆₂ 0.00000004 0.00000055 true false false 3 true 14
Inhibin C₅₅₇Hβ‚ˆβ‚†β‚†Nβ‚β‚„β‚ˆOβ‚β‚ˆβ‚€S₆ 0.00000175 0.00000260 true false false 100 false 5
Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) C₇₇H₁₀₉N₂₁Oβ‚‚β‚€ 0.000000004 0.000000100 true false false 20 false 1
Motilin C₁₁₄Hβ‚β‚‡β‚ˆN₃₂O₃₁Sβ‚‚ 0.00000007 0.00000027 true false false 5 true 13
Neuropeptide Y (NPY) Cβ‚β‚ˆβ‚‰Hβ‚‚β‚ˆβ‚…Nβ‚…β‚…O₅₇ 0.0000002 0.0000008 true false false 20 false 0
Orexin C₅₆Hβ‚ˆβ‚ƒN₁₃O₁₃ 0.000000002 0.000000100 true false false 20 true 0
Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) C₁₄₂Hβ‚‚β‚‚β‚„Nβ‚„β‚‚Oβ‚„β‚„ 0.00000020 0.00000500 true false false 7 true 4
Peptide YY (PYY) C₁₉₄H₂₉₅N₅₇O₅₇ 0.00000003 0.00000070 true false false 8 true 14
Secretin C₁₃₀Hβ‚‚β‚€β‚…N₃₉Oβ‚„β‚‚ 0.00000002 0.00000055 true false false 5 true 15
Somatostatin C₇₆H₁₀₄Nβ‚β‚ˆO₁₉Sβ‚‚ 0.00000005 0.00000025 true false false 1 false 4
Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) C₁₆Hβ‚‚β‚‚N₆Oβ‚„ 0.000000165 0.000000870 true false false 5 true 8
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This demonstrates putting Tab Separated Values (TSVs) directly in Scroll files.
Although this approach is handy for small datasets, it does not scale as well as ScrollSets.
Natural Disaster Description Measurement Scale Min Max
Hurricane A tropical cyclone with sustained winds of 74 mph (119 km/h) or higher Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale 1 5
Earthquake Sudden shaking of the Earth's surface caused by the release of energy Moment Magnitude Scale (MMS) 0 10
Tsunami A series of ocean waves caused by underwater disturbances, such as earthquakes Tsunami Intensity Scale 1 6
Tornado A violently rotating column of air that extends from a thunderstorm to the ground Enhanced Fujita (EF) Scale 0 5
Volcanic Eruption The release of lava, ash, and gases from a volcano Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI) 0 8
Wildfire An uncontrolled fire in a natural area, often caused by lightning or human activity Burned Area 0 Varies
Flood An overflow of water that submerges land that is usually dry Flood Severity 0 Varies
Drought A prolonged period of abnormally low rainfall, leading to a water shortage Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) -10 10
Landslide The movement of rock, earth, or debris down a slope due to gravity Landslide Velocity Scale 1 7
Avalanche A rapid flow of snow down a slope, often triggered by weather or human activity Avalanche Danger Scale 1 5
Blizzard A severe snowstorm with high winds and low visibility Regional Snowfall Index (RSI) 1 5
Hailstorm A storm that produces hailstones, which are balls of ice that fall from the sky TORRO Hailstorm Intensity Scale H0 H10
Heat Wave A prolonged period of excessively hot weather Heat Index (HI) 80Β°F Varies
Cold Wave A prolonged period of excessively cold weather Wind Chill Index Varies Varies
Dust Storm A strong wind that carries large amounts of dust and debris Dust Storm Intensity 0 Varies
Sinkhole A depression or hole in the ground caused by the collapse of the surface layer Sinkhole Size 0 Varies
Limnic Eruption A rare type of natural disaster where dissolved carbon dioxide suddenly erupts from deep lake water No Scale - -
Meteor Impact The collision of a meteoroid, asteroid, or comet with the Earth's surface Torino Impact Hazard Scale 0 10
Solar Flare A sudden, rapid, and intense variation in brightness on the Sun's surface Solar Flare Classification System (X-class) A1 X28+
Geomagnetic Storm A temporary disturbance of the Earth's magnetosphere caused by solar wind shock waves NOAA Space Weather Scale for Geomagnetic Storms G1 G5
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This demonstrates putting Tab Separated Values (TSVs) directly in Scroll files.
Although this approach is handy for small datasets, it does not scale as well as ScrollSets.
Name Transverse Longitudinal Medium Required Propagation Speed (m/s) Min Frequency (Hz) Max Frequency (Hz) Common Sources Primary Uses or Effects Key Characteristics Examples Impact on Environment/Humans
Electromagnetic Waves True False False 299792458 Varies Varies Sun, radio transmitters Communication, medical imaging, cooking Can travel in vacuum and through transparent media Radio broadcasts, X-rays Varies; UV can cause skin cancer
Sound Waves False True True 343 20 20000 Vibrating objects Communication, music, sonar Travels through elastic media Talking, concerts, ultrasound imaging Noise pollution can affect health and well-being
Seismic Waves True True True 3500 Varies Varies Earthquakes, explosions Earthquake engineering, oil exploration Can cause significant ground movement Earthquakes, nuclear testing Can cause extensive property damage and loss of life
Gravitational Waves True False False 299792458 0.0001 Varies Colliding black holes, neutron stars Astronomy, testing theories of gravity Ripples in spacetime Facilitated by LIGO and other observatories None known; mostly relevant for astrophysics
Thermal Waves False True True Varies Varies Varies Heating elements, sun Heating, climate control Move through conduction, convection, or radiation Heat in homes, atmospheric heat waves Heat waves can cause health issues and environmental stress
Chemical Waves False True True Varies Varies Varies Chemical reactions Chemical processing, biological signaling Propagation of reaction and diffusion Calcium waves in cells, Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction Can be critical in biological processes
Combustion Waves False True True Varies Varies Varies Fire, explosions Fire safety, controlled burns Propagation of fire through combustible materials Wildfires, controlled burns Can cause massive destruction and pollution
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What is a ScrollSet? Read the one page paper.
Note: these ScrollSets were generated by LLMs without extensive human review.

Concepts

id speed yearInvented passengers range
High-speed rail 268 1964 1000 1500
Maglev train 375 1984 1000 500
Hyperloop (proposed) 760 2013 28 900
Concorde (retired) 1354 1969 100 4500
Boeing 747 614 1969 660 9800
Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird (retired) 2193 1964 2 3200
Space Shuttle (retired) 17500 1981 7 500
SpaceX Crew Dragon 17500 2020 7 500
Virgin Galactic SpaceShipTwo 2500 2018 6 50
Blue Origin New Shepard 2500 2015 6 60
Bugatti Chiron Super Sport 300+ 304 2019 2 300
Hennessey Venom GT 270 2010 2 400
Koenigsegg Agera RS 278 2015 2 600
ThrustSSC (land speed record car) 763 1997 1 50
North American X-15 (retired) 4520 1959 1 200

Measures

Name Values Coverage Question Example Type Source SortIndex IsComputed IsRequired IsConceptDelimiter Crux
id 15 100% What is the ID of this concept? High-speed rail string 1 false true true
speed 15 100% The maximum speed of the transportation mode in miles per hour (mph) 268 number 1.9 false
yearInvented 15 100% The year the transportation mode was invented 1964 number 1.9 false
passengers 15 100% The typical number of passengers the transportation mode can carry 1000 number 1.9 false
range 15 100% The maximum range of the transportation mode in miles 1500 number 1.9 false
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What is a ScrollSet? Read the one page paper.
Note: these ScrollSets were generated by LLMs without extensive human review.

Concepts

id classDescription commonAlgorithms
O(1) Execution time remains constant regardless of input size. Finding array element by index, adding a node to the head of a linked list
O(log n) Execution time grows logarithmically in proportion to the input size. Binary search
O(n) Execution time grows linearly with the input size. Linear search, traversing an array
O(n log n) Execution time grows linearly and logarithmically with the input size. Quick sort, merge sort
O(n^2) Execution time grows quadratically with the input size. Bubble sort, selection sort, insertion sort
O(n^3) Execution time grows cubically with the input size. Naive matrix multiplication
O(2^n) Execution time grows exponentially based on the input size. Brute force solutions for the traveling salesman problem, recursive calculation of Fibonacci numbers
O(n!) Execution time grows factorially based on the input size. Solving the traveling salesman problem via brute force, generating all permutations of a set

Measures

Name Values Coverage Question Example Type Source SortIndex IsComputed IsRequired IsConceptDelimiter Crux
id 8 100% What is the ID of this concept? O(1) string 1 false true true
classDescription 8 100% A brief explanation of the complexity class, often describing how the time or space requirements grow with the size of the input. Execution time remains constant regardless of input size. string 1.9 false
commonAlgorithms 8 100% Examples of algorithms or operations that typically exhibit this level of complexity. Finding array element by index, adding a node to the head of a linked list string 1.9 false
Continue reading...
What is a ScrollSet? Read the one page paper.
Note: these ScrollSets were generated by LLMs without extensive human review.

Concepts

id wikipedia type applications keyAdvancements inventorDeveloper invented resolution
Optical Microscope https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Optical_microscope Optical General biological and medical microscopy Improved lens quality and microscope design for better image clarity and detail. Zacharias Janssen (attributed) 1590 200
Electron Microscope https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electron_microscope Electron Cellular biology, materials science, virology Enhanced magnification and resolution, allowing visualization of structures at the atomic level. Ernst Ruska and Max Knoll 1931 0.2
Scanning Tunneling Microscope https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scanning_tunneling_microscope Scanning Probe Surface science, nanotechnology Ability to image surfaces at the atomic level. Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer 1981 0.1
Confocal Microscope https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confocal_microscopy Optical 3D imaging of biological samples Provides optical sectioning capability to observe multiple layers within specimens. Marvin Minsky 1957 200
Atomic Force Microscope https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atomic_force_microscopy Scanning Probe Nanotechnology, surface engineering Can image non-conductive materials, providing a three-dimensional surface profile. Gerd Binnig, Calvin Quate, Christoph Gerber 1986 0.1
Fluorescence Microscope https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorescence_microscope Optical Biological sciences, medical diagnostics Uses fluorescence and phosphorescence to study properties of organic or inorganic substances. Oskar HeimstΓ€dt 1911 200
Phase Contrast Microscope https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phase_contrast_microscopy Optical Live cell imaging without staining Enhances contrast in transparent and colorless samples. Frits Zernike 1934 200
Transmission Electron Microscope https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transmission_electron_microscopy Electron Material science, cancer research, virology Capable of imaging at a significantly higher resolution than light microscopes, down to the level of atomic structures. Ernst Ruska 1933 0.05
Scanning Electron Microscope https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scanning_electron_microscope Electron Materials research, forensic examinations, biological research Produces high-resolution images of a sample surface, revealing detailed topography. Manfred von Ardenne 1942 1
Digital Microscope https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_microscope Optical Education, industrial inspection, clinical research Integration with digital cameras and computers for enhanced imaging and analysis. Various contributors 1980 200
Stereo Microscope https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stereo_microscope Optical Manufacturing, botany, entomology Provides a three-dimensional viewing experience by using two separate optical paths. Cherubin d'Orleans 1671 10000
X-ray Microscope https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X-ray_microscopy X-ray Material sciences, paleontology Uses X-rays to penetrate samples and create images of the internal structure. Raymond Castaing 1946 50
Cryo-Electron Microscopy https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryo-electron_microscopy Electron Structural biology, virology Allows imaging of samples at cryogenic temperatures, preserving native state. Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank, Richard Henderson 1975 0.1

Measures

Name Values Coverage Question Example Type Source SortIndex IsComputed IsRequired IsConceptDelimiter Crux
id 13 100% What is the ID of this concept? Optical Microscope string 1 false true true
wikipedia 13 100% A URL to learn more about this kind of microscope. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Optical_microscope string 1.9 false
type 13 100% Classify each microscope by type (e.g., optical, electron, scanning probe) to allow users to filter and understand the specific applications and functionalities of different microscopes. Optical string 1.9 false
applications 13 100% Describe common or notable applications of each microscope type, such as biology, materials science, nanotechnology, etc. This helps users understand where a particular microscope can be best utilized. General biological and medical microscopy string 1.9 false
keyAdvancements 13 100% List significant improvements or iterations made over the initial model. This could include details on enhancements in resolution, usability, or adaptation to different scientific needs, showing the evolution of the technology. Improved lens quality and microscope design for better image clarity and detail. string 1.9 false
inventorDeveloper 13 100% Knowing who invented or developed the microscope can provide historical context and acknowledgment of significant contributions in the field. This also helps in understanding the geographical and institutional origins of Zacharias Janssen (attributed) string 1.9 false
invented 13 100% The year this telescope was invented 1590 number 1.9 false
resolution 13 100% The smallest resolution it can see, in nanometers. 200 number 1.9 false
Continue reading...
What is a ScrollSet? Read the one page paper.
Note: these ScrollSets were generated by LLMs without extensive human review.

Concepts

id spectralType distance apparentMagnitude absoluteMagnitude radialVelocity mass
Proxima Centauri M5.5Ve 4.24 11.13 15.6 -22.204 0.1221
Alpha Centauri A G2V 4.37 -0.01 4.38 -21.4 1.1
Alpha Centauri B K1V 4.37 1.33 5.71 -18 0.907
Barnard's Star M4.0Ve 5.96 9.54 13.22 -110.51 0.144
Sirius A A1V 8.66 -1.46 1.42 -5.5 2.02
Sirius B DA2 8.66 8.44 11.34 -5.5 1.018
Luyten 726-8 A M5.5Ve 8.73 12.52 15.46 -32.5 0.102
Luyten 726-8 B M6Ve 8.73 13.05 16.24 -25 0.1
Ross 154 M3.5Ve 9.69 10.44 13.92 -9.6 0.17
Ross 248 M5.5Ve 10.32 12.29 15.8 -81 0.136
Epsilon Eridani K2V 10.48 3.73 6.18 15.5 0.82
Lacaille 9352 M0.5V 10.73 7.34 10.58 -37 0.45
Ross 128 M4V 11 11.15 14.79 -30 0.168
EZ Aquarii A M5Ve 11.08 12.87 16.47 -60 0.13
EZ Aquarii B M5Ve 11.08 12.87 16.47 -60 0.13
EZ Aquarii C M5Ve 11.08 12.87 16.47 -60 0.13
61 Cygni A K5V 11.4 5.2 7.49 -64.3 0.67

Measures

Name Values Coverage Question Example Type Source SortIndex IsComputed IsRequired IsConceptDelimiter Crux
id 17 100% What is the ID of this concept? Proxima Centauri string 1 false true true
spectralType 17 100% Classification of the star based on spectral characteristics and temperature, ranging from O (hot and blue) to M (cool and red) M5.5Ve string 1.9 false
distance 17 100% The distance to the star from Earth, measured in light-years or parsecs 4.24 number 1.9 false
apparentMagnitude 17 100% The brightness of the star as seen from Earth 11.13 number 1.9 false
absoluteMagnitude 17 100% The intrinsic brightness of the star if it were placed at a standard distance of 10 parsecs from Earth 15.6 number 1.9 false
radialVelocity 17 100% The speed at which the star moves towards or away from the Solar System, measured in km/s -22.204 number 1.9 false
mass 17 100% The mass of the star, expressed in solar masses 0.1221 number 1.9 false
Continue reading...
What is a ScrollSet? Read the one page paper.
Note: these ScrollSets were generated by LLMs without extensive human review.

Concepts

id organism diameter low median high
Mitochondria human 1000 200 500 2000
Chloroplast plant 6000 20 40 100
Nucleus human 6000 1 1 2
Golgi Apparatus human 1200 10 20 50
Endoplasmic Reticulum human 120 1 1 5
Ribosome human 25 10000 50000 100000
Lysosome human 1200 50 200 500
Peroxisome human 500 100 300 500
Vacuole plant 30000 1 1 3
Centrosome human 700 1 2 2
Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum human 120 1 1 5
Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum human 150 1 1 5
Nucleolus human 2500 1 1 4
Plasmodesmata plant 50 1000 5000 10000
Mitosome protozoa 500 5 10 20
Hydrogenosome protozoa 500 5 10 20
Glyoxysome plant 300 100 200 300
Chromoplast plant 2000 2 5 10
Amyloplast plant 2000 5 10 30
Elaioplast plant 1000 10 20 50
Periplastidial compartment (PPC) plant 100 5 15 30
Flagellum protozoa 200 1 1 10
Cilium human 250 10 50 100

Measures

Name Values Coverage Question Example Type Source SortIndex IsComputed IsRequired IsConceptDelimiter Crux
id 23 100% What is the ID of this concept? Mitochondria string 1 false true true
organism 23 100% The organism name mainly associated with the organelle such as human, plant, whale, etc. human string 1.9 false
diameter 23 100% The diameter of the organelle in nanometers 1000 number 1.9 false
low 23 100% For cells that have this kind of organelle, how many are usually found on the low end? 200 number 1.9 false
median 23 100% For cells that have this kind of organelle, how many are usually found in the median? 500 number 1.9 false
high 23 100% For cells that have this kind of organelle, how many are usually found on the high end? 2000 number 1.9 false
Continue reading...
What is a ScrollSet? Read the one page paper.
Note: these ScrollSets were generated by LLMs without extensive human review.

Concepts

id wikipedia creators appeared openSource
JavaScript https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JavaScript Brendan Eich 1995 true
Python https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Python_(programming_language) Guido van Rossum 1991 true
Java https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Java_(programming_language) James Gosling 1995 true
C++ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C%2B%2B Bjarne Stroustrup 1979 true
C# https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_Sharp_(programming_language) Microsoft 2000 true
PHP https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PHP Rasmus Lerdorf 1995 true
Swift https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swift_(programming_language) Apple Inc. 2014 true
Go https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Go_(programming_language) Robert Griesemer, Rob Pike, Ken Thompson 2009 true
Kotlin https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kotlin_(programming_language) JetBrains 2011 true
Ruby https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruby_(programming_language) Yukihiro Matsumoto 1995 true
Rust https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rust_(programming_language) Graydon Hoare 2010 true
Scala https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scala_(programming_language) Martin Odersky 2004 true
TypeScript https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TypeScript Microsoft 2012 true
Dart https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dart_(programming_language) Lars Bak, Kasper Lund 2011 true
Elixir https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elixir_(programming_language) JosΓ© Valim 2011 true
Clojure https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clojure Rich Hickey 2007 true
Haskell https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haskell_(programming_language) Lennart Augustsson, Dave Barton, Brian Boutel, Warren Burton, Joseph Fasel, Kevin Hammond, Ralf Hinze, Paul Hudak, John Hughes, Thomas Johnsson, Mark Jones, Simon Peyton Jones, John Launchbury, Erik Meijer, John Peterson, Alastair Reid, Colin Runciman, Philip Wadler 1990 true
Lua https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lua_(programming_language) Roberto Ierusalimschy, Waldemar Celes, Luiz Henrique de Figueiredo 1993 true
Perl https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perl Larry Wall 1987 true
R https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R_(programming_language) Ross Ihaka, Robert Gentleman 1993 true

Measures

Name Values Coverage Question Example Type Source SortIndex IsComputed IsRequired IsConceptDelimiter Crux
id 20 100% What is the ID of this concept? JavaScript string 1 false true true
wikipedia 20 100% What is the Wikipedia page for this language? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JavaScript string 1.9 false
creators 20 100% Who created this language? Brendan Eich string 1.9 false
appeared 20 100% What year was the language publicly released and/or announced? 1995 number 1.9 false
openSource 20 100% Is the language open source? true boolean 1.9 false
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